Entertainment

Netflix's Amanda Knox is a chilling anatomy of a trial by media

As we’ve seen in the recent U.S. election, people will believe even the most ludicrous misinformation if you repeat it often and loudly enough.

Daily Mail freelancer Nick Pisa.

contributed

Daily Mail freelancer Nick Pisa.

THE SHOW: Amanda Knox
THE MOMENT: The real guilty parties

Giuliano Mignini, the head cop in the 2007 murder case of British student Meredith Kercher in Perugia, Italy, tells the camera why he was convinced that Kercher’s roommate, American student Amanda Knox, was the killer.

“Let’s imagine what Meredith found when she came home,” he says, just making stuff up. “She sees Amanda with Raffaele Sollecito and Rudy Guede,” about to have sex. “She couldn’t take it anymore. She must have scolded Amanda for her lack of morals. Amanda must have felt irritated, humiliated.”

How he knows what either woman “must have felt,” he never explains.

Then one of the lead reporters on the story, Daily Mail freelancer Nick Pisa — who printed whatever Mignini fed him — chirps, “I don’t think I ever had so many front pages,” while copies of his headlines appear onscreen: “Man-Eater,” “Femme Fatale.”

Eventually Knox was acquitted and Kercher’s murderer was found. But the two jackasses above are guilty as sin for their campaign of lies and innuendo.

Their crap kept Knox on trial for eight years, until the case arrived before the supreme court of Italy, which overturned her conviction based on the “stunning flaws” in Mignini’s investigation.

As we’ve seen in the recent U.S. election, people will believe even the most ludicrous misinformation if you repeat it often and loudly enough. Watching this doc, you can’t help but shiver: Take one crooked cop, introduce him to one shameless reporter, whip up some nasty public opinion and you can destroy the life of literally anyone.

Amanda Knox is streaming on Netflix.