Entertainment

Josh Holloway: The stakes get higher on season 2 of 'Colony'

FILE - This Aug. 12, 2015 file photo shows Josh Holloway, a cast member in USA Network's

FILE - This Aug. 12, 2015 file photo shows Josh Holloway, a cast member in USA Network's "Colony," in Beverly Hills, Calif. "Colony" returns for its second season on Thursday at 10 p.m. EST. (Photo by Casey Curry/Invision/AP, File)

NEW YORK — Josh Holloway says he's terrible at keeping secrets, which is ironic because the actor has starred in two TV shows where it's key to keep plot points quiet: ABC's "Lost" and now USA's "Colony," premiering its second season Thursday at 10 p.m. EST.

"My wife laughs at me all the time. She's like, 'God, you'd be the dead-est spy,'" Holloway said in a recent interview.

"It's true, I'm terrible at hiding."

So what was the biggest secret he recalls having to keep on "Lost"?

"When I finally hooked up with Kate in the cages," he laughed. "I knew that was gonna be a good one. And then we kind of did the time-travel thing, I was like, 'Ooh, they're goin' wild now.' But, it was great."

"Colony" is set in the near future, where extraterrestrials have taken over and formed a military occupation. Walls have been erected to keep people out (sounds oddly timely) and also block people in.

Holloway and co-star Sarah Wayne Callies play a husband and wife who are trying to reunite their family, separated by the colonization.

He talks about the show's current themes and how he stays creative off camera.

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The Associated Press: Talk about season two of "Colony."

Holloway: Season two is very exciting. Rarely do shows elevate the second season. They normally take a little dip second season and then third season find their stride but I'm really proud of this season. It delves a lot deeper into what colonization really is and the darker side of that.

AP: The show is oddly timely with talks of government and walls.

Holloway: Colonization is the oldest trick in the book. We've been doing it to each other since the beginning of human existence but it's very current. We have a president now that wants to put up walls. We have a country divided. Some want to collaborate, some want to exist. It's not only current in America but globally.

AP: How do you spend your time off?

Holloway: I'm writing. We'll see where it goes but I've written an animated script and a comedy and pitched them and done all that stuff. That's a lot of fun for me, whether it goes anywhere or not doesn't really matter to me. The biggest gift is when you finish it and you're like, 'Wow, I did it. There it is.'

AP: Is it hard to find that time to sit down and write?

Holloway: Very. Now I have two children and they're wild so now I've got to get away from the house. I was like, 'Where can I have an office and then I discovered it. The library! No one goes to the library anymore! I'm gonna be in the library writing! (Laughs.)

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Follow Alicia Rancilio at http://www.twitter.com/aliciar

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Online:

http://www.usanetwork.com/colony