Entertainment

Holy Chicken! It's a Super Size Me sequel

Documentarian Morgan Spurlock returns to cast a spotlight on the food industry — from the inside out.

Morgan Spurlock stars in his sequel to Super Size Me, entitled Super Size Me 2: Holy Chicken.

COURTESY OF TIFF

Morgan Spurlock stars in his sequel to Super Size Me, entitled Super Size Me 2: Holy Chicken.

It’s hard to believe it’s been 13 years since Morgan Spurlock attempted to eat nothing but McDonald’s for a month in a reckless bid to expose the ills of the fast-food industry.

In fact, his cinematic stunt in 2004’s Super Size Me was so impactful, it sent burger buyers running for the health store and earned the filmmaker an Oscar nomination. It even forced McDonald’s to abandon their “super-sizing” policy (although they deny it was due to the movie).

Certainly, restaurant chains like McDonald’s now emphatically boast “healthy” and “socially responsible” products but just how has fast-food actually improved since Spurlock got super sized?

“A lot has changed in how we look at food; a lot has changed in the industry but I think that just from a storytelling standpoint, I’m in a different place,” said Spurlock ahead of this Friday’s world premiere of Super Size Me 2: Holy Chicken! at the Toronto International Film Festival. “To kind of revisit this now is exciting.”

In the long-awaited sequel, Spurlock returns to cast a spotlight on the food industry — this time from the inside out. Instead of playing an overindulgent consumer of cheeseburgers, Spurlock goes behind the scenes and attempts to open his own franchise called Holy Chicken!

“If you look at the first film, Super Size Me is a great look at the food industry told from a consumer perspective,” said Spurlock. “What we wanted Super Size Me 2 to represent was to have an industry perspective — how does the industry view consumers? How does it view us almost as commodities? How does it view their role in what they do?”

As such, Spurlock dives headfirst into that world — from exploring poultry farms to opening a mock pop-up shop. However, perhaps most eye-opening in the sequel is today’s sly marketing of the merchandise.

“It’s almost a similar message to the first film but I think that sometimes when it comes to the choices we make or what we’re being sold we don’t see the forest for the trees,” insisted Spurlock, whose chicken franchise apparently showcased a satirical mission statement and “artisanal” tap water.

“We get to a position of trust when it comes to the companies we buy things from (and) sometimes having a large dose of honesty somewhere along the way is a good cure-all.”

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