Entertainment

Paris Review editor, facing harassment allegations, resigns

NEW YORK — The editor of the Paris Review has resigned amid allegations of sexual harassment.

Magazine board president Terry McDonell told The Associated Press that Lorin Stein submitted his resignation on Wednesday. The Paris Review, one of the world's most prestigious literary journals, was founded in 1953 and edited by George Plimpton for 50 years. Stein, who took over in 2010, was only the fourth editor in the magazine's history.

"The Paris Review has no tolerance for sexual harassment," the Review said in a statement. "We are committed to whatever is necessary to ensure that the Paris Review is free from harassment and discrimination of any kind."

Also Wednesday, a spokesman for the publisher Farrar, Straus & Giroux told the AP that Stein had resigned from his position as editor at large. Stein had been a fulltime editor at FSG before joining the Review and had worked with such prize winning authors as Denis Johnson and Jonathan Franzen.

An email to Stein seeking comment was not immediately returned.

Stein's resignation from the Review was first reported by The New York Times, which said that Stein acknowledged dating and expressing interest in women he knew professionally, including interns and writers, and that he wrote a letter expressing his remorse. A Times profile of Stein from 2011 was headlined "The Paris Review's New Party Boy" and described the editor as a "serial dater" and "an unabashed bon vivant who favours bespoke shirts and tailor-made suits by Kirk Miller."

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