Entertainment

The Insult shows how a small slight can escalate out of control

Richard Crouse reviews Lebanon’s first-ever Oscar contender, a documentary revisiting the 1978 classic Midnight Express, and Diane Kruger’s portrayal of a woman seeking vengeance.

Rita Hayek, left, and Adel Karam in a scene from The Insult.

Cohen Media Group

Rita Hayek, left, and Adel Karam in a scene from The Insult.

The Insult 3½ stars

The Insult, Lebanon’s first-ever Academy Award nomination for best foreign language film, centres around a small slight that escalates out of control.

Writer-director Ziad Doueiri humanizes the conflict metaphorically, showing the effects of dehumanizing rhetoric and hate.

The Insult is a serious, powerful film that offers not only emotion but also empathy.

Billy Hayes raises the Turkish flag in Midnight Return.

Contributed

Billy Hayes raises the Turkish flag in Midnight Return.

Midnight Return 3½ stars

The documentary Midnight Return revisits the success and controversy surrounding the release of the 1978 blockbuster Midnight Express.

Part true-life crime story, part making-of doc, the film has interesting insights into real-life subject Bill Hayes and his life before and after his arrest.

Hayes’s trip back to Istanbul, reveals the deep level of hurt beneath his bravura exterior, elevating Midnight Return from talking head doc to character study.

In the Fade stars Diane Kruger as a woman who seeks vengeance after her life is torn apart by violence.

Contributed

In the Fade stars Diane Kruger as a woman who seeks vengeance after her life is torn apart by violence.

In the Fade 3 stars

In the Fade stars Diane Kruger as a woman who seeks vengeance after her life is torn apart by violence.

In the Fade’s story of terrorism and violence against immigrants is a timely one.

A churning vessel of rage, hurt and despair, Kruger is a very human presence at the centre of a bleak and somewhat disjointed story.

*Ratings out of 4 stars

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