News / Calgary

Airplane noise rattles Calgary, Marlborough residents

City councillor hopes for deviation in routes to reduce noise pollution

The Marlborough Community Association is holding a meeting to address residents concerns about airplane noise on Jan. 20.

Metro File Photo

The Marlborough Community Association is holding a meeting to address residents concerns about airplane noise on Jan. 20.

The noise of airplanes passing over Calgary Councillor Ray Jones' home is loud enough that it rattles his china cabinet.

“When they fly over – I swear to God – you’re sitting on your deck in the summer time and you can almost count the rivets on the bottom of the plane,” he said.

This isn’t a new issue for Jones, or the residents of Marlborough, but the Marlborough Community Association has partnered with the Calgary Airport Authority and Nav Canada to hold a community meeting on Jan. 20. It will address what the community association calls an overwhelming amount community feedback and concern.

Jones said a slight deviation in the flight paths would move the aircraft routes over commercial areas – and greatly reduce the complaints from residents.

Jody Moseley, Calgary Airport Authority spokesperson, said the planes already deviate when possible.

Moseley said when the airport’s parallel runway system was created, aircraft needed to make a 15 degree turn, to avoid any drift which would create safety concerns.

However, after feedback from a community consultants committee, which has representatives from Marlborough, aircrafts began making only 10 degree turns when possible, to avoid residential areas.

“Now, it doesn’t mean they can always do that,” she said. “You could have a weather cell at the end of the runway, or an aircraft or flock of birds, which means they have to turn more.”

Moseley said they look at any option to get aircraft away from residents, but sometimes it’s unavoidable.

“I can tell you, there are always going to be planes flying over houses,” she said. “It’s a very busy city and we’re a growing airport, a growing city.”

Jones said a five-point deviation from current routes would make a world of difference.

“I mean, in the wintertime, you don’t hear it so much because your doors aren’t open. But in the summer and the spring, or fall, when you’re sitting out on your deck, I’m not kidding, you couldn’t talk.”

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