News / Calgary

Calgary's Resolve nearly ready to open 30 unit building for homeless

Stepping Stone Manor the first of 11 buildings in Resolve campaign

Officials were on hand for the unveiling of Stepping Stone Manor – a new 30 unit apartment with supportive housing for Calgary’s homeless. Pictured here is Scott Haggins, chair of Cedarglen Homes, Alan Norris, chair of Resolve, Cole Haggins, Cedarglen Homes; Ward Haggins, Cedarglen Homes and Sharon deBoer, Calgary Homeless Foundation.

Brodie Thomas / Metro

Officials were on hand for the unveiling of Stepping Stone Manor – a new 30 unit apartment with supportive housing for Calgary’s homeless. Pictured here is Scott Haggins, chair of Cedarglen Homes, Alan Norris, chair of Resolve, Cole Haggins, Cedarglen Homes; Ward Haggins, Cedarglen Homes and Sharon deBoer, Calgary Homeless Foundation.

It could be the beginning of the end of homelessness in Calgary.

On Wednesday, the Resolve campaign showed off Stepping Stone Manor, the first of 11 buildings that will be built to house 3,000 of the city’s homeless.

Alan Norris, chair of the Resolve Campaign, said the 30 brand-new units will provide supportive housing for clients.

He said the clients will pay rent for the rooms, but how much they pay will be based on what they can afford, because the buildings are debt free.

“If it’s debt free, it gives you the flexibility to make sure the tenant is only paying what is appropriate,” said Norris.

Diana Krecsy, president and CEO of the Calgary Homeless Foundation, said the first clients could move into Stepping Stone Manor in the next two months.

“This is their space, their place to begin to address issues – but it’s their permanent home,” she said.

The Calgary Homeless Foundation will be hiring an agency to manage the building and provide services to the tenants. They’re not quite ready to reveal the successful candidate, but said the agency has a long history in Calgary.

The foundation also has a triage process for determining who gets the next available room in Stepping Stone Manor, or any of the future buildings.

The Resolve campaign is a collaboration of nine not-for-profit agencies that has the goal of ending homelessness in the city. There are 11 homebuilders that are volunteering with Resolve to construct the 11 buildings.

The corporate partners put 30 cents towards each dollar raised by Resolve.

Norris said through Resolve, two more buildings are already under construction, and a third is in the final planning stages.

“We’ve learned a lot with this building to take to the next one and make it more efficient,” he said.

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