News / Calgary

U of C hosts art exhibit for trans, non-binary, and gender-variant artists

Artist hosts lunch-and-learn to talk about queer and trans artists

Zac Slams, a student at the University of Calgary, is hosting a lunch-and-learn focusing on trans, non-binary and gender-variant artists on Thursday. Slams and fellow artists will have an exhibition at the resource centre for two months.

Kenneth Appleby / For Metro

Zac Slams, a student at the University of Calgary, is hosting a lunch-and-learn focusing on trans, non-binary and gender-variant artists on Thursday. Slams and fellow artists will have an exhibition at the resource centre for two months.

Calgary Artist Zac Slams is slamming down on under-exposure for trans artists.

Along with seven other creative minds, Slams is hosting an exhibit at the Women’s Resource Centre at the University of Calgary to showcase trans, non-binary and gender-variant artists. The exhibit will be going on from April to June, but Slams will be hosting a lunch-and-learn about the project titled Trans Pirate 4 Justice on April 7 at the centre.

“The exhibition is to highlight the LGBTQ people who live in Calgary,” she said. “We have an installation, Polaroid’s, self-portraits, collages and a rap album.”

Slams said that the exhibit is not only about justice for trans, gender-queer and non-binary people, but about justice for intersexuality as well.

“There are trans, non-binary, gender queer people in the city who are making things,” she said. “So, pay attention and give them opportunities.

“These people are looking for chances to exhibit their work and they’re not necessarily getting enough (exposure) because of marginalization or lack of chances.”

Dr. Rita Henderson, a medical and educational anthropologist who is a postdoctoral fellow based out of the Department of Family Medicine at U of C, said that the idea for the exhibit came from a research project that focused on confronting structural violence – a form of harm that is systemic and is embedded in beliefs and practices in society.

“That knowledge can sit in peer reviewed journals and it can sit among certain isolated segments of society unless we find mechanisms like art to get the word out and to normalize conversations around these experiences,” she said. “I hope people take from it an increased comfort with the message of inclusion and health promotion.”

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