News / Calgary

Calgarians frustrated city not towing enough vehicles in street sweepers' paths

The program is weeks ahead of schedule and has towed 1,000 vehicles so far

Street sweeping vehicles still aren't picking up enough dust for Calgarians who have complained about the lack of ticketing.

Metro File Photo

Street sweeping vehicles still aren't picking up enough dust for Calgarians who have complained about the lack of ticketing.

It's an issue that to some Calgarians is up there with the dandelion debate – except people are calling Ward offices asking for more ticketing.

Councillors have been getting a high volume of calls as the city as the revamped spring street cleaning program is underway. Concerns have been raised over parking compliance, the city changing cleaning dates, and gravel left behind after communities haven't had offenders towed.

According to transportation boss Mac Logan, so far the city is about 89 per cent complete in its fourth week. So far compliance is worst in the inner-city and there have been about 1,000 tows so far.

"The compliance has been quite good in the northwest and southwest and poorer in the southeast and central districts," Logan said.

Typically in the past the city only towed vehicles along major thoroughfares. Among changes this year, crews are sweeping seven days a week, handing out tickets in residential ares for those parked during a sweep, and will be impounding or towing cars for sitting tight when there's a no parking sign present.

Although enforcement has been ramped up this year, the city said they don't actually have enough towing power and ticket-writers on staff to follow each street sweeping crew.

Coun. Shane Keating said it would be ideal if the city could take the Parkplus automated ticketing vehicles through communities.

"You could give every vehicle electronic tickets if they're parked there and should not be," said Keating. "This would alleviate enough ticket writers and enough parking authority to do it."

Logan said this wouldn't be ideal as it doesn't notify people fast enough that they need to move their cars.

"The automated machines that do use cameras to write the tickets, can write the tickets, the problem is that ticket comes in the mail," Logan said. "You actually need somebody to physically go and put something underneath the wiper…we do door hangers, we have road staff that actually go door-to-door that give people advanced notification that we're coming around."

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