News / Calgary

Calgary's robot company makes it look bleep bloop easy

EZ Robot on of top Canadian startups selected for mentorship program in Silicon Valley

EZ Robots kits, found primarily in schools, are designed to let kids experiment and create unique configurations from the pieces.

Courtesy EZ Robot

EZ Robots kits, found primarily in schools, are designed to let kids experiment and create unique configurations from the pieces.

Calgarian DJ Sures sees robotics as one of the biggest industries of the future – and he’s using his startup EZ Robot to ensure that industry is sustainable.

EZ Robot sells robot building kits primarily in education, and has recently been noticed as one of Canada’s most promising startups by being selected by the C100 Association for the 48Hrs in the Valley program – which helps foster startups through mentorship in Silicon Valley.

Their selection is the result of their success bringing robot kits to schools. The kits are customizable – the pieces clip together like Lego – and will teach kids the necessary skills to venture in robotics after graduation.

A robot building kit by ez robot.

ezrobot

A robot building kit by ez robot.

“A lot of companies are trying to create a Formula 1 car before they make the Model T,” he said. “You need to educate people, you need to educate students in order to have employees hired to sustain that industry.”

He said one of the biggest issues robots manufacturers are facing is the lack of people trained to work in the field.

“Hiring people is really hard when you’re a brand new technology,” he explained. “We deal with it all the time, I can’t even imagine what it would be like for a company putting billions of dollars into a project.”

A JD Humanoid by rzrobot.

ezrobot

A JD Humanoid by rzrobot.

Sures has seen some of the most creative ideas for the technology come from children in classrooms. He’s seen a child come up with a design for a robot that helps feed his grandparents – or a garbage can that follows the user around the kitchen and takes itself out at the end of the day.

“The inventions they come up with – children haven’t heard the word no as many times as an adult has,” Sures said. “They’re very creative, they ask their parents things like, ‘Mum, why do you have to take the garbage out every week?’ Why can’t a robot do it?’”

Sures hopes to move his technology into industries to help current experts in the field learn a bit more, in the hopes of creating a sustainable flow of employees for robotics companies to grow.

Metro Savers