News / Calgary

Low Income Transit Pass funded for 2017

Administration says its ready to meet expected funding shortfall

The city will not have to look around for funding to meet an expected shortfall due to Calgary Transit Low Income passes. Administration says 2017's shortfall won't be a problem.

Metro File

The city will not have to look around for funding to meet an expected shortfall due to Calgary Transit Low Income passes. Administration says 2017's shortfall won't be a problem.

City administration says it won’t need to scrape up extra cash right away to implement its sliding scale program for Calgary Transit low income monthly passes.

In a report going to the city’s Community and Protective Services Committee on Wednesday, administration says it won’t need extra funding to counter any additional shortfall up to the end of 2017.

The program – set to start early in 2017 - will tie the cost of a transit pass more closely to one’s income on a sliding scale, meaning some people could pay as little as $5.15 a month for a transit pass.

The current price is $44 for anyone who qualifies.

The sliding scale model was made possible by a $13.5 million funding commitment from the province. Administration is projecting that beyond that provincial funding, the revenue shortfall will be $255, 000 in 2017, $490,000 in 2018, and  $1.5 million in 2019.

Coun. Shane Keating, chair of the city’s transportation committee, said the program could offset some of its costs as more people purchase the discounted pass.

“You may have more people buying the pass, which may supplement it a bit because they couldn’t afford it before but now they can,” he said.

Administration says it will continue to look for way to pay for the program as the expected revenue shortfall grows over the next three years. The hope is that the program will become sustainable in the long term.

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