News / Calgary

Calgary constable recipient of National Youth Justice Policing Award

Constable Jeremiah Stump recognized for his work with indigenous youth

Suffering a brain aneurysm in February, Stump said he woke up everyday throughout his recovery excited to go back to work.

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Suffering a brain aneurysm in February, Stump said he woke up everyday throughout his recovery excited to go back to work.

When Calgary police Const. Jeremiah Stump moved to the city, he soon realized he was forgetting his indigenous roots and something needed to change.

Stump is now being recognized for his key role in the Indigenous Team of the CPS’ Youth at Risk Development program, where working with a social worker he incorporates cultural teachings while creating opportunities for youth to connect with their cultural roots.

Stump is the 2016 recipient of the Minister of Justice National Youth Justice Policing Award.

“For me, I love this gig. I grew up on the reserve, came to the city, and had strong mentors, but they weren't indigenous. So you kind of forget where you come from,” said Stump who added he knew the impact of his work watching the excitement on the faces of the kids at a round-dance.

Last February, Stump left his role after suffering a brain aneurysm out playing hockey with work friends. After several months of therapy, Stump said he woke up everyday looking forward to going back to work and was blown-away when he found out he won the award.

“Mentoring these youth as a job, I couldn’t ask for more. It’s not really work,” said Stump.

The Youth Justice award celebrates innovate policing that serves to inform police and the community about creative responses to youth crime. It is awarded to police officers who take innovative approaches in responding to, preventing and reducing the rate of youth crime.