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Calgary advocate talks #Diabetes21 for Diabetes Awareness Month

21-day challenge to raise awareness for disease that affects more than two hundred thousand Albertans

Buzz Bishop’s 21-day challenge ended on Nov. 18, world diabetes day. He did the Five BX workout program to raise awareness for the disease that affects more than two hundred thousand Albertans.

Jennifer Friesen / For Metro

Buzz Bishop’s 21-day challenge ended on Nov. 18, world diabetes day. He did the Five BX workout program to raise awareness for the disease that affects more than two hundred thousand Albertans.

It only takes 21 days to develop a new habit—and that’s why during diabetes awareness month the Canadian Diabetes Association (CDA) challenged people in the #diabetes21. 

Buzz Bishop, radio host for XL103Calgary and Southern Alberta Regional Director of the CDA did his own 21-day challenge to raise awareness for the disease that affects more than two hundred thousand Albertans. 

“If you can keep that chain going for 21 days your body gets used to it. It becomes habitual, it comes easier and you can get over the hump and do it,” he said. “It doesn’t have to be anything extreme. It can be as basic as 5 minutes of meditating everyday or making your own lunch instead of buying it.”

Bishop said there are many small steps people can take that will positively change their life— and that is what the challenge is all about. 

For his challenge Bishop did FIVE BX, a workout program created by the Canadian Armed Forces nearly 60 years ago. Five BX is made up of five exercises for pilots to do anywhere, including sit-ups, push-ups and jumping jacks. 

Alberta’s Health minister, Sarah Hoffman has also advocated for the disease in November for Diabetes Awareness month. Earlier this month, her ministry hosted advocates at the legislature. 

She said as of today, hundreds of thousands of people in Alberta live with both Type 1 and Type II diabetes—and the number continues to rise. 

“That’s why our programs, like Alberta Healthy Living, which gives Albertans with diabetes access to community based chronic-disease management resources, are so important,” she said. “That’s why we support the Canadian Diabetes Association Advocacy Committee and their efforts to use Diabetes Awareness Month to make Albertans aware of the challenges facing diabetics, how to prevent this life-changing disease and the need for more research.”

Bishop said although the #Diabetes21 challenge is focused more on curbing Type II habits, it can make people think about what it might be like to live with Type I. 

“You can learn to empathize with a type 1 diabetic who has to think about everything they put into their body and everything they do with their body and how that will affect things,” he said.

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