News / Calgary

CPS internal survey indicating member satisfaction expected to be released Tuesday

Rising number of CPS officers indicated feeling overworked and understaffed in the 2015 CPC employee survey. How will 2016 survey results compare?

Both the Chief of Police and the CPA boss have said they don't expect survey results to improve much – if at all – in 2016.

Metro File Photo

Both the Chief of Police and the CPA boss have said they don't expect survey results to improve much – if at all – in 2016.

In 2015 the Calgary Police Service internal survey showed that all wasn’t well within CPS ranks, with nearly 60 per cent officers registering negative comments about their jobs and workplace.

Metro has learned that on Tuesday the CPS is expected to release the results from the 2016 survey to both the members and, for the first time, to the public. 

In previous interviews with both Calgary’s top cop, Chief Roger Chaffin, said they don’t expect the 2016 survey results to have improved compared to 2015’s results.

“We’ve picked up that employee engagement is the prime mission for the leadership group,” Chaffin told Metro in October.

He said all signs are pointing to a membership that’s on the brink.

“You’ve got a very tired  work force  and they’re working through their capacities and I don’t believe they’re getting enough contemporary feedback from the organization of assessments of their development as officers,” he said.

Calgary police association boss, Howard Burns, agreed.

 “I wouldn’t anticipate there being a huge improvement in this year’s survey,” said Burns, noting a push for greater transparency has officers keeping track of more than they used to.

Results from the 2015 annual employee survey conducted by the Calgary Police Commission (CPC) into Calgary Police Service (CPS) member satisfaction shows 58 per cent of those who took the survey registered negative comments, including feeling overworked and that they dealt with too heavy a workload, were understaffed and stressed. In comparison, 42 per cent registered negative comments in 2014.

Seventy-four per cent of respondents registered positive comments, down from 80 per cent in 2014.  

Twenty-three per cent strongly agreed they were satisfied with available training in their job and only 14 per cent strongly agreed they were satisfied with effectiveness of communication within the CPS, while 54 per cent overall agreed to some extent. Forty-six per cent disagreed.

Only 12 per cent of respondents strongly agreed morale was good at CPS, the lowest in seven years. Overall, roughly 50 per cent agreed to some extent that morale was good.

The results of the 2016 survey are expected to be released Tuesda

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