News / Calgary

Calgary transportation boss advises fix for cul-de-sac angled parking issue

Coun. Shane Keating and transportation manager Mac Logan agree a local improvement approach to allow cul-de-sac angled parking quelch fix community strife

Calgary cul-de-sac parking jobs have been tumultuous in the past year, as complaints result in fines for residents who have parked on an angle for years to save space.

Metro File Photo

Calgary cul-de-sac parking jobs have been tumultuous in the past year, as complaints result in fines for residents who have parked on an angle for years to save space.

Cul-de-sac living has come to a boil in the past few months, as city parking bylaw officers clamped down on angled parking in the rounded street ends.

But Coun. Shane Keating is hoping administration can tackle the issue from another angle.

“I’m trying to sort out what can be done, rather than just saying we can’t park there,” said Keating. “It’s kind of gone down to a neighbourhood dispute, rather than an issue of real parking as a complaint comes in.”

Last year, a number of angled-parking ticketing incidents made headlines when officers hit cars that had been parking in the oddly-shaped streets for years.

“There are cul-de-sacs that would allow for angled parking without question,” said Keating. “Could we have a process similar to speed limits, where we can change the speed limits as long as it’s signed.”

The councillor noted the process could include a petition by residents, cost for putting up signs and remove disputes.

The city’s bylaw only allows angled parking where signs indicate. This mirrors the province’s bylaw that states you must park parallel to the curb.

Transportation boss Mac Logan said the city is guided by legal and practical circumstances when it comes to parking infractions. He said there are 2,500 cul-de-sacs in the city, some are small and can’t accommodate angled parking.

“If there was angled parking there, there’s insufficient room for a garbage truck to circulate, frankly a pickup truck probably couldn’t turn around,” said Logan. “Notwithstanding there are locations where there’s physically enough room.”

Logan said roads have come up with a number of options, but he highlighted a local improvement approach, instead of a blanket bylaw change.

That way, Logan said, the community would be on the hook for the city’s costs to install signage, a modest cost and a fair price for the taxpayer.

“I think it would be appropriate that a notice of motion be put forward to that effect,” said Logan.

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