News / Calgary

Six community hubs set to open in Calgary

The City of Calgary, Rotary Club of Calgary and United Way of Calgary and Area have raised $3.8-million for the five-year project

Neil Berg, Mayor Naheed Nenshi, Katie Black and Karen Young celebrated the launch of six neighbourhoods getting "community hubs" over the next five years.

Jennifer Friesen / For Metro

Neil Berg, Mayor Naheed Nenshi, Katie Black and Karen Young celebrated the launch of six neighbourhoods getting "community hubs" over the next five years.

Since your average living room can’t accommodate thousands of guests, Calgary has planned for six community living rooms to open in the city over the next five years.

Dubbed “community hubs,” each space will serve as a gathering place for the neighbourhood, offering services, activities and space.

“That’s what community hubs are all about,” said Mayor Naheed Neshi. “They’re about making sure that every single person not just belongs, and feels like they belong, but that every single person has access and resources to services that can help them live the best life that the can possibly want.”

The City of Calgary, Rotary Club of Calgary and United Way of Calgary and Area have teamed up to launch the initiative, having raised $3.8-million to-date.

So far, two community hubs are up and running at the Village Square Leisure Centre and the Genesis Centre, but the remaining four will be in the communities of Greater Forest Lawn, Bowness, Vista Heights and Sunalta.

Approximately 200,000 Calgarians will be served by the community hubs, but each one will be unique. Residents are a part of the planning and the services and amenities are built to reflect each community’s needs.

“Listening to residents will inform the next phase of the project and ensure that we design something that meets the need of each community,” said Neil Berg, Rotary International district 5360 governor.

“Available and accessible recreation, mentoring and afterschool programs, access for parents to programs that connect them with resources to help promote healthy child development – making communities that are strong, supportive and inclusive.”

The partnership is the “first of its kind” in Canada, according to Karen Young, president and CEO of United Way of Calgary and Area, but she said that they hope it sparks a trend across communities across Canada.

“Look at what we can accomplish together,” she said. “We’re not just stopping here, we’ve got this whole city of Calgary that we want to create vibrant, caring and safe communities for all.”

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