News / Calgary

Albertans keen on Brian Jean for leader of the UCP: Survey

As the United Conservative Party inches toward a leadership race, Albertans are eyeing who their conservative czar will be

Wildrose leader Brian Jean celebrates the yes vote during the Unity Vote at the Wildrose Special General Meeting in Red Deer Alta, on Saturday July 22, 2017.

The Canadian Press

Wildrose leader Brian Jean celebrates the yes vote during the Unity Vote at the Wildrose Special General Meeting in Red Deer Alta, on Saturday July 22, 2017.

It seems Albertans are sweet on Brian Jean for the leader of the United Conservative Party.

A new online Insights West survey found that 44 per cent of Albertans like Brian Jean, including 74 per cent who voted for the Wildrose Party in the 2015 provincial election. Conversely, only one-third of Albertans, 32 per cent, had a favourable view of Kenney.

“At this early stage, Brian Jean appears to be successfully connecting with voters in Calgary and Edmonton,” said Mario Canseco, Vice President, Public Affairs at Insights West, in a prepared release.

“The former Wildrose leader is also perceived more favourably than any other leadership hopeful by women and residents aged 55 and over.”

For those who voted NDP, Jean is also winning the popularity contest over his opponent Jason Kenney.

What's more, is that 52 per cent of the province don't know who Jeff Callaway is, another leader hopeful. But two-in-five, 43 per cent, are familiar with Doug Schweitzer.

The survey also asked Albertans how they would vote depending on who wins the October UCP leadership race.

Jean was the best performer with 35 per cent of provincial votes, and 20 per cent would vote for the NDP government. If Kenney was the leader, he would secure 30 per cent of the vote.

The survey results are based on an online study using 704 adult Albertans conducted by Insights West from August 24 to August 27. Data has been statistically weighted according to the Canadian census figures for age, gender and region. The margin of error is plus or minus 3.7 per cent nineteen times out of twenty.

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