News / Calgary

'I'm tired:' Calgarian says Cranston traffic is adding 30 minutes to commute

Help in the form of an interchange is on its way, but will take the Province of Alberta two years to construct

Calgarian Samantha Gill faces a long commute home each day and wishes there were more options to get into her community of Cranston.

ELIZABETH CAMERON / for Metro

Calgarian Samantha Gill faces a long commute home each day and wishes there were more options to get into her community of Cranston.

Samantha Gill is at the end of her rope in Cranston.

This week, she and friends in the deep southeast neighbourhood commiserated, not for the first time, about the 30 minutes it takes them to get out of the single exit in their community every morning. She's lived in the community for four years but is considering up and leaving her home.

"There's just so many people in that small area, it seems like everyone is leaving at 7 a.m.," Gill said.

"It's just crazy, every morning it takes forever."

In a photo she shared with Metro there are cars lined up in the alleyway behind Cranford Drive, a regular occurrence, according to Gill, who said she has tried the strategy herself without much success.

"I'm just so tired of it," Gill said. "I'm tired of waiting."

Area Coun. Shane Keating said, in this case, the residents are put in between a rock and a hard place.

"It's easy to ask for patience, but that's not going to solve the problem and it's not going to make people feel any better," said Keating.

The city's short-term plans according to Ryan Murray, a city spokesman, include signal timing adjustments at the intersection of Cranarch Road/Cranberry Rd SE earlier this summer to help with increased traffic during the evening commute.

"In light of the recent feedback, we’re in the process of reviewing the traffic signal timing to see how we can better accommodate the current traffic demands in this area," Murray said.

Additionally, the province's plans for Interchange 212 are breaking ground ​this week.

"The project is expected to take two years to build," said government spokesman Adam Johnson. "Once completed, this interchange will improve access to the South Health Campus, unlock the potential for many construction jobs in Calgary and improve existing connections for residents in southeast Calgary."

Keating said there's not much else that can be done in Cranston that's not already in motion.

But although there's relief in sight, Gill said she's working with a real estate agent to get out of the community because she can no longer stand the commute.

"The traffic and the location, it's just so inconvenient," Gill said. "It gets to you after a while."


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