News / Calgary

Midfield Park residents allowed to stay — for now

A Calgary judge allowed residents to stay for at least another two months

Midfield Park resident Rudy Prediger comments outside court on the decision to delay eviction for the mobile home residents.

Helen Pike - Metro

Midfield Park resident Rudy Prediger comments outside court on the decision to delay eviction for the mobile home residents.

Midfield Park residents will be able to stay in their homes longer after a court order promised to slow eviction proceedings for two more months. 

The City of Calgary's original eviction notice, served a year ago, planned having residents out of the southeast mobile park on Sept. 30. 

But lawyer Mathew Farrell representing at least six residents who refuse to leave their homes says the city doesn't have the right to kick mobile home owners out. 

"You can't throw someone out of a home ... without a good reason," said Farrell. He told reporters these reasons are specifically outlined in law. "They basically boil down to not paying rent or breaching an agreement somehow, you need to fix the place up or you need to use it for something else."

He argues in this case the city has no plans for the land, and they're not fixing utilities – they're simply ripping them out. 

According to council's decision, the park needed to be shut down because of safety concerns stemming from the aging infrastructure built underneath the parcel of land (instead of the adjacent roadways). 

The consent order, approved by a judge on Monday, will see residents who wish to stay at Midfield safe to live there until at least Nov. 22 when the matter on whether or not the city had a right to evict residents comes back to court. 

Midfield resident Rudy Prediger said he's been in the park for 47 years and he's being asked to leave. He believes the Midfield residents are being discriminated against. 

"They've been trying to kick us out of there since 2010," said Prediger. "The choice we have is to take the $10,000 they've offered us and tear (the mobile home) down. I'm not going to do that, they're going to have to build around me."

He said residents at Midfield pay their property taxes too, so the city should fix the utilities if they're broken. 

"Why do we pay taxes?" he said.

"If the infrastructure is failing, fix it."

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