News / Calgary

Future of taxi, TNC advisory committee hangs in Calgary council balance

It's a brave new world for Calgary's taxi industry, and soon the advisory committee that spoke for industry stakeholders may soon be decommissioned

FEB.2, 2016 FILE PHOTO The Uber logo is seen in front of protesting taxi drivers at the Montreal courthouse, on February 2, 2016. Saskatchewan may see ride-hailing services such as Uber sooner rather than later. Proposed legislation was introduced today that would open the door for the companies to begin working in the province. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Ryan Remiorz

Ryan Remiorz / The Canadian Press

FEB.2, 2016 FILE PHOTO The Uber logo is seen in front of protesting taxi drivers at the Montreal courthouse, on February 2, 2016. Saskatchewan may see ride-hailing services such as Uber sooner rather than later. Proposed legislation was introduced today that would open the door for the companies to begin working in the province. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Ryan Remiorz

Calgary's Livery and Transportation Advisory Committee has been feeling a cold shoulder from council, and now the relationship and changes in the industry have come to a head.

The group that once acted as a liaison between taxis, and now Transportation Network Companies (TNC), could soon be defunct.

On Wednesday, the Community and Protective Services Standing Policy Committee voted to dismantle the committee in favour of consulting and engaging with stakeholders and the public on a case-by-case basis – like the systems currently in place in Toronto and Edmonton.

Several members of the current LTAC board, as well as past members, came to the committee to speak about their experience on the board.

Some, like Kurt Enders, endorsed an option for not just disbanding the committee as it is but adding a group within the city's livery transport services made up of six industry representatives to meet once every quarter.

"Last week's LTAC meeting, I would have to say it was probably one the most painful meeting's I've been through," said Enders. "Most of that meeting was for information purposes only, which then gets accepted for information and goes off into never-never land."

The final decision on the advisory committee will come to councillors this month, and if accepted, LTAC will finish up meeting effective January 1, 2018.

Last year, the city spent $298,000 to run the committee and dedicate staff to creating reports for the LTAC meetings.

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