News / Calgary

Cyclists feel 'left out' by Calgary police as bike theft continues climb

Currently thefts are 53 per cent higher than the five year average

Bike Calgary partnered with the City of Calgary to put stickers on City bike racks in an effort to educate cyclists on how to keep their bikes safe from theft.

Jennfer Friesen / for Metro

Bike Calgary partnered with the City of Calgary to put stickers on City bike racks in an effort to educate cyclists on how to keep their bikes safe from theft.

Calgary's cycling community is feeling left out in the cold as bike thefts continue to rise without signs of slowing.

Year to date, police are seeing two-wheel thefts up 53 per cent over the five-year average. In 2015 alone, bike thefts spiked 44 per cent over the previous year. 

So far this year bike thefts are up four per cent from the same period last year.

And those at Bike Calgary are asking Calgary police to do more about the concerning trend.

"It's too high," said Agustin Louro. "This is a problem ... we're feeling left out here."

He said it's concerning those thefts are going up annually and although Bike Calgary collaborates with the City of Calgary on educational programs, big gains aren't going to come without direct bike prevention programs administered through Calgary Police Service.

In 2015, Calgary police discontinued research into a bait bike program, and although they have investigated a bike registry to help citizens in stolen-goods recovery, police didn't invest the cash to kick it off. These are two examples successful in other jurisdictions Bike Calgary believes could help.

No one from CPS was available to comment on Wednesday. But in previous reports, officers told Metro they do try to educate Calgarians on how to best lock up and prevent the crimes of opportunity – they've met with condo boards downtown especially to help educate residents.

In the wintertime, most theft is concentrated in break-and-enter thefts. In 2017, 34 per cent of bikes were nabbed from parking garages, backyard sheds and other personal property.

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