News / Canada

A list of women who could be on Canadian currency

Submissions can be made on the bank's website between now and April 15.

Polymer bank notes are shown during a news conference at the Bank of Canada in Ottawa on April 30, 2013.Prime Minister Justin Trudeau says the Bank of Canada is looking for a woman to be featured on a new bank note starting in 2018. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Sean Kilpatrick

Polymer bank notes are shown during a news conference at the Bank of Canada in Ottawa on April 30, 2013.Prime Minister Justin Trudeau says the Bank of Canada is looking for a woman to be featured on a new bank note starting in 2018. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Sean Kilpatrick

OTTAWA — A look at five women who could be candidates to be on Canadian currency:

Nellie McClung (1873 to 1953)

Political activist Nellie McClung was one of the strongest voices of the women's suffrage movement across Canada. She helped stage a mock parliament in Manitoba in 1914, that satirized what people claimed were the dangers of allowing women to vote and helping win support for the campaign.

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Lucy Maud Montgomery (1874 to 1942)

Author Lucy Maud Montgomery has enchanted readers the world over with her "Anne of Green Gables" books, which chronicle the adventures of a red-headed orphan on Prince Edward Island. The prolific writer's works have been translated into about 20 languages.

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Anges MacPhail (1890 to 1954)

Anges MacPhail was elected Canada's first female member of Parliament in 1921 - the first election where Canadian women were allowed to cast ballots. The staunch human rights champion fought for prison reform, old-age pension and women's rights throughout her time in politics.

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Mary Pickford (1892 to 1979)

She may have been known as America's Sweetheart, but legendary film actress Mary Pickford was actually Canadian. The talented actress was also a shrewd business woman and, at 24-years-old, became the first woman in Hollywood to earn $1 million a year.

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Emily Carr (1871 to 1945)

Emily Carr's modernist landscape paintings have made her one of Canada's best-known artists. Her work portrays the vast beauty of British Columbia, with a heavy influence from the First Nations villages, and is showcased in galleries and museums around the globe.

Note to readers: This is a corrected list. A previous version wrongly said Emily Carr was a member of the Group of Seven