News / Canada

Paramedics honoured for helping students, teachers in Saskatchewan shooting

Paramedic Kalvin Jones attends the Investiture of Bravery Awards at Government House in Regina, Saskatchewan on Monday October 17, 2016. He was awarded a bravery medal for his response during the Jan. 22, 2016 school shooting in La Loche, Saskatchewan. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Michael Bell

Paramedic Kalvin Jones attends the Investiture of Bravery Awards at Government House in Regina, Saskatchewan on Monday October 17, 2016. He was awarded a bravery medal for his response during the Jan. 22, 2016 school shooting in La Loche, Saskatchewan. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Michael Bell

REGINA — Two paramedics who went into a northern Saskatchewan school while a shooter was on the loose have been recognized for their bravery.

Kalvin Jones and Darryl Morin received medals from the Royal Canadian Humane Association at a ceremony Monday in Regina.

In January, Jones and Morin responded to an emergency call at the high school in La Loche and learned a shooter was still in the building. With the help of RCMP, Morin and Jones got injured students and staff out, then aided patients at the hospital.

Jones said there was a lot of chaos and they trusted RCMP to keep them safe.

"They led the way and we went in and we did the best we could," Jones recalled.

"They were still searching for him in the area, so he could have come out of anywhere. During that time I had a little bit of a scare when one of the students opened up a door and startled me while I was doing CPR. I still have dreams of that every now and then, but it's gotten a lot better since."

A teacher and a teacher's aide were killed at the school and seven others were hurt. Two brothers were shot dead at a nearby home.

A teenage boy, who can't be named under the Youth Criminal Justice Act, is charged with first-degree murder and attempted murder.

Jones said he has had a lot of fear and anxiety since the shooting. He has acute stress disorder and is getting counselling, which he said has helped.

He has gone back to school and is upgrading to become a primary care paramedic.

"It was a tough experience, but I feel that I can probably do it for the rest of my life, that's how I feel."

Morin said he wasn't sure what to expect when he got the call to the high school. All the responders, including police, doctors and nurses, should be recognized for their efforts that day, he said.

Morin, who has been a paramedic for 16 years, has been off work since the shooting.

He doesn't want to discuss his diagnosis.

"I'm trying to help myself get past this call. I'm never going to forget it, but I'm trying to deal with," he said after the ceremony.

Morin said he wants to go back to work and has a plan to return.

"I just love this job. I like helping people."