News / Canada

Seven stories in the news today, Jan. 13

Seven stories in the news for Friday, Jan. 13

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TRUDEAU TO CONTINUE GRASSROOTS TOUR

Prime Minister Justin Trudeau begins the second day of a whirlwind outreach tour at CFB Trenton in eastern Ontario this morning, where he will have breakfast with soldiers before moving on to a jam-packed day. Trudeau is set to hold town halls in Peterborough and London, Ont., with a number of photo-opportunities in between including with youth from La Loche, Sask., at the Toronto Raptors training facility.

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MORNEAU TO GET ECONOMIC ADVICE

Bill Morneau is in Toronto today to partake in a long-standing tradition of federal finance ministers putting together a budget. He'll meet with private sector economists in Toronto to get their take on the economic lay of the land. One issue that is sure to be discussed is how the economic policies of Donald Trump's presidency will affect the Canadian economy.

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SENATORS DUEL OVER SPENDING

Conservative Senator Leo Housakos is taking issue with comments the Trudeau government's point man in the upper chamber has made on Senate expenses.  Peter Harder told The Canadian Press the Senate has a long way to go toward making change. Housakos says Harder's comments ignore the work senators have done on the matter and is unhelpful in improving the Senate's image with Canadians.

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ACADEMICS WEIGH IN ON BOYDEN ANCESTRY

Academics are questioning Joseph Boyden's statements and interviews about his indigenous roots. They say the comments are too vague and don't fully address the heart of the controversy surrounding his heritage. The Aboriginal Peoples Television Network launched an investigation last month into claims of indigenous ancestry the novelist has made throughout his life.  On Wednesday, Boyden said his heritage isn't neatly laid out in official records but instead rooted in stories told by his family.

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CALGARY JUDGE FACING REMOVAL HEADS INTO NEW TERRITORY

A Calgary judge who asked a sex assault complainant why she couldn't keep her "knees together'' could be headed into uncharted territory if he continues to fight his removal from the bench. A Canadian Judicial Council committee concluded Justice Robin Camp's apology wasn't enough to offset the damage done and that he should lose his job. Camp has asked to appear before the council, a request that will be considered when it meets at the end of this month.

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ONTARIO FIRST NATION TO START DEER CULL

The Caldwell First Nation and members of Parks Canada are going to kill off deer that are causing ecological problems for the Point Pelee National Park on the shores of Lake Erie.  A herd of white-tailed deer that has been eating its way through the rare forest and savannah. Hunters hope to reduce the 84 deer to 24 to 32 animals, a number that will allow plants and trees to recover.

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WINTER HUMP DAY HAS ARRIVED

It's the dead of winter and a senior climatologist at Environment Canada says it should be a national holiday for those who aren't big fans of winter. Dave Phillips says it means there is more winter behind us than ahead of us. He says the dead of winter is calculated by noting the average temperature for every day of the year. On the day that average hits its lowest, we've hit bottom.

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