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Canada geese impaled with arrows recovering at wildlife refuge

The two birds with arrows poking through their bodies were captured on Lake Couchiching north of Lake Simcoe earlier this week.

Two Canada geese are recovering at Shades of Hope Wildlife Refuge in Pefferlaw after having surgery to remove arrows that were impaling their bodies. Cottagers on Lake Couchiching north of Lake Simcoe noticed the birds as early as May. They were able to capture the birds and bring them to the refuge so the arrows could be removed.

Shades of Hope Wildlife Refuge/Facebook

Two Canada geese are recovering at Shades of Hope Wildlife Refuge in Pefferlaw after having surgery to remove arrows that were impaling their bodies. Cottagers on Lake Couchiching north of Lake Simcoe noticed the birds as early as May. They were able to capture the birds and bring them to the refuge so the arrows could be removed.

Two Canadian geese found on Lake Couchiching north of Lake Simcoe were living in pain, impaled by arrows.

People from surrounding cottages helped capture the birds and drive them about an hour south to Shades of Hope Wildlife Refuge in Pefferlaw.

Some of those cottagers told Aaron Quattrociocchi, the animal care manager at Shades of Hope, that they’d seen the impaled birds on the lake since May.

The rescue mission was a “public effort from some outstanding people,” Quattrociocchi said. One bird arrived on Monday and the second on Tuesday this week.

Quattrociocchi said the geese were managing, considering the arrows ran completely through their bodies.

“The first one had (an arrow) going from one side of his body to the other side,” he said. “The second one had it going from its back to its breast, and then on top of the arrow, the second one was actually shot on two separate occasions,” he said, noting there were two different bullets in its body.

Quattrociocchi explained that their injuries meant the geese weren’t able to sustain themselves.

GooseArrowxray

Shades of Hope Wildlife Refuge/Facebook

GooseArrowxray

“They weren’t eating a whole lot; they were very thin. So that’s what they actually would have died from was malnutrition as opposed to the arrow,” he said, adding the removal of the arrows went well, for the most part.

“The first one it was a little touch and go,” he said, detailing how the bird’s heart stopped during the surgery and it had to be revived. “He woke up and he did well after that.”

Both of the birds are recovering at the refuge now. One goose had its wing injured by the arrow and is receiving daily physiotherapy. The refuge hopes he will be released in a month, while the second should be healed in a few weeks.

“I can’t say I’ve ever seen (an animal) come in with an arrow poking through its body, but we do get many animals that have just been shot and come to us,” Quattrociocchi said.

If people notice an animal that has been injured, he said the best thing to do is contact a local wildlife rehabilitation centre.

“We’re here to help animals that suffer. People don’t realize how much pain these animals are actually in,” Quattrociocchi said. “Imagine if you were shot with an arrow, right? It does hurt. We want the animals to not have to live in pain and that’s why we’re here.”

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