News / Canada

Five important changes on the way to Canada's citizenship act

Immigration Minister Ahmed Hussen announced another wave of changes Wednesday. It's part of Bill C-6, which amends the Citizenship Act to ease the immigration process.

Immigration Minister Ahmed Hussen announced another wave of changes to the immigration process as part of Bill C-6.

Colin Perkel / The Canadian Press

Immigration Minister Ahmed Hussen announced another wave of changes to the immigration process as part of Bill C-6.

Immigration Minister Ahmed Hussen announced another wave of changes Wednesday. It's part of Bill C-6, which amends the Citizenship Act to ease the immigration process.

Here are five important changes in the bill. Some have been in effect since June, while others, specifically physical presence and language requirements, will be effective starting Oct. 11.

Revocation: Dual citizens convicted of terrorism, spying or treason will face the Canadian justice system like any other citizen who breaks the law. No one can strip their citizenship.

Intent: Applicants are no longer required to express intent to continue to live in Canada after receiving citizenship. This gives many people the flexibility to work outside the country.

Physical presence: Permanent residents will have to be physically present in Canada for three out of five years before applying. Previously it was four out of five years. Another rule, requiring applicants to be in Canada for 183 days each year, is being scrapped. Permanent residents will now be allowed to go abroad to study, work or for family reasons without losing access to citizenship eligibility.

Prior days: Time spent in Canada before becoming a permanent resident will now count toward the physical presence requirement, up to one year.

Knowledge and Language: Only applicants between the ages of 18-54 will be required to take and pass a citizenship knowledge and language test. The requirement previously extended to ages 14-64.

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