News / Canada

Metro Cities: Cornwallis comes down, enticing family-friendly buildings, and living wage stickers

Inspiring urbanism and the biggest news in cities from across our Metro markets for the week of Jan. 27-Feb. 2.

The statue of Edward Cornwallis is removed from its pedestal in South End Halifax on Wednesday. The day before, Halifax regional council voted to take down the statue of the city's controversial founder and put it in storage.

Zane Woodford / Metro

The statue of Edward Cornwallis is removed from its pedestal in South End Halifax on Wednesday. The day before, Halifax regional council voted to take down the statue of the city's controversial founder and put it in storage.

A statue of controversial historical figure Edward Cornwallis was removed from a Halifax park this week after regional council voted it be taken down. A bald eagle soared overhead as workers wrenched the bronze into pieces and dismantled the plaque declaring Cornwallis the founder of the city. Some councillors called the representation of the man who issued a bounty on the scalps of Mi’kmaq people a "barrier to reconciliation."

On to the roundup

TOP NEWS

Two Calgary city councillors are questioning plans for all 15 members of council and the mayor to attend a June meeting of the Federation of Canadian Municipalities in Halifax.

INSPIRING URBANISM

After a Calgary small business owner created stickers declaring "Living wage paid here," an Edmonton shop has ordered a batch.

As a handful of business owners revolt over a Toronto pilot project to speed up transit on King St., locals are attending weekly lunches at pro-transit restaurants.

Vancouverites got a taste of bannock on wheels, as the city's first Indigenous food truck opened up shop last weekend.

A group of Halifax students pleaded with politicians to stop ordering reports on the matter and just ban plastic bags already.

Torontonians are taking staycation to the next level and renting Airbnbs in their own city in order to understand their home in a more profound way.

HOT TOPICS

Downtown Halifax is facing a 17 per cent vacancy rate in office space, which has some real estate advisors sounding the alarm over the future of heritage properties and the rise of urban sprawl as companies opt for suburban business parks over the city's core.

Halifax is pondering how to speed up buses, including proposals to build bus lanes at the expense of on-street parking.

To encourage more family-friendly buildings, city officials in Edmonton have proposed offering two extra storeys for developers who build at least eight three-bedroom units in new buildings.

A group that represents municipalities in British Columbia is calling for significant tax and regulatory changes for a comprehensive approach to more affordable housing, The Canadian Press reports.

DIVERSIONS

A weekend long read about the team in charge of way finding in Vancouver's transit service.

In the sad darkness of winter, a look at how cities can be designed to enhance happiness.

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