News / Edmonton

Edmonton budget highlights: Coyotes, breweries, Rossdale

The city’s coyotes will have a few more watchful eyes on them next year as council approved funding $200,000 to hire more officers.

The city’s coyotes will have a few more watchful eyes on them next year as council approved funding $200,000 to hire more officers.

SHAWN MCCREADY / FLICKR

The city’s coyotes will have a few more watchful eyes on them next year as council approved funding $200,000 to hire more officers.

Councillors moved closer to a final budget Wednesday as some items made the cut and others didn’t. Here are the highlights:

1) Brewery building banked

Councillors begrudgingly funded rehabilitation work at the Molson brewery site, but delayed when the cash will flow.

In 2018, the city will start putting $800,000 a year, over nine years, into a program to help cover costs of restoring the historic brewery in Oliver.

But several councillors expressed reservations about spending money on what, ultimately, is a privately owned building.

Coun. Ben Henderson said the option of making restoration part of the rezoning for the development is long gone and this would save an important piece of the city’s history. 

“That horse is out of the barn and if we want to save this building that is the only option available to us.”

2) Coyote communications

The city’s coyotes will have a few more watchful eyes on them next year as council approved funding $200,000 to hire more officers.

Coun. Michael Walters championed the idea and said in addition to the new officers the money would pay for public education — including the message people should “please stop feeding coyotes.”   

3) ‘Complicated’ Rossdale

Proposed planning work for the Rossdale area will continue after councillor narrowly supported more funding for the project.

The money will allow the city to work on plans for the area, which includes Telus Field and the old Rossdale power plant. Coun. Mike Nickel opposed the funding.

“It would be the wrong place to be putting the cash,” he said. “We have to start prioritizing.”

Coun. Michael Oshry said otherwise. 

“This is the most interesting piece of land in the city that is undeveloped and it’s the most complicated piece of land.”

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