News / Edmonton

Edmonton engineers plan Scona Road upgrades, but speed limit stays

Traffic studies show intersection at Saskatchewan Dr. is the hotspot for majority of collisions.

Residents have cited accidents involving the bollards north of the intersection as proof that pedestrians along the road.

Metro File

Residents have cited accidents involving the bollards north of the intersection as proof that pedestrians along the road.

Edmonton traffic engineers want to hear from the public on their plans for a safer Scona Road, but the speed limit on the hotly debated stretch of road won’t be changing.

City engineers undertook two safety studies of the road; one a more traditional look focusing on collision and vehicle counts and another using video analysis of traffic that showed not just the crashes, but the accidents that almost happened.

“It digs deeper into the traffic safety analysis to look at conflicts or near misses,” said Shewkar Ibrahim with the Office of Traffic Safety.

That analysis showed them the majority of the problems, either with pedestrians or just two vehicles, happens in the southbound lanes as people move to make the right turn from Scona Road to Saskatchewan Drive.

The office has an open house planned for Jan. 18 at the Strathcona Centre Community League Hall from 5:30 to 8 p.m. Ibrahim said they believe they have hard data and can present reasonable solutions to the community.

“We wanted to do a study to find out exactly what the issues are and find ways to mitigate them,” she said.

She said in addition to speed warning signs and flashing pedestrian lights coming up the hill, the office wants to redesign the right-hand turn lane to make it safer.

Residents have expressed concerns about the current pedestrian crossing and Ibrahim said they hope to address those issues as well as sightlines and other concerns.

“There are going to be a lot of elements that are taken in with this particular design.”

Council has debated raising the speed limit on the section of road before, but Ibrahim said both traffic studies confirmed it should remain the same.

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