News / Edmonton

A vision of 'minimum connectivity' for active transport in Edmonton

More than 340 participant cyclists and walkers provided direct feedback to Paths for People proposal.

Crosswalks, bikelanes, and the ways they connect are part of the 'minimum connectivity' vision set to be released.

Metro file

Crosswalks, bikelanes, and the ways they connect are part of the 'minimum connectivity' vision set to be released.

Paths for People is set to release its vision of what it calls a 'minimum connectivity' grid in Edmonton that, if built, could see roughly 140,000 people live within two blocks of safe cycling and walking infrastructure.

On Friday, the group will publicly release the grid proposal it has developed through a crowdsourced map online, which has asked the more than 340 participant cyclists and walkers for their direct feedback. 

The grid will be presented online and at a special event with international urbanist Gil Penalosa, who is coming to Edmonton to discuss how the group's vision can improve the city.

Penalosa coined the 'minimum connectivity' term as a way to discuss city infrastructure not aimed at motorists that can provide a bare minimum of functionality for cyclists and walkers.

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