News / Edmonton

Edmonton police lay first 'paper terrorism' charge against Freeman on the Land

Allen Boisjoli, 45, of Vegreville faces charges of intimidation of a justice system participant.

Allen Boisjoli,45, shown in an Alberta Sherriffs' bulletin.

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Allen Boisjoli,45, shown in an Alberta Sherriffs' bulletin.

Edmonton Police have laid a first ever charge of “paper terrorism” against an Alberta man associated with the Freemen on the Land movement.

Allen Boisjoli, 45, of Vegreville is charged with intimidation of a justice system participant.

Boisjoli is accused of attempting to place a $225,000 lien on a police officer’s personal property after the police officer gave him a speeding ticket. While others have been charged with intimidation before, Edmonton Police believe it’s the first time where an incident has involved simply filing paperwork.

Det. Rae Gerrard said the documents Freemen present have no legal force, but are meant to make people in the system want to drop the case. Freemen or Sovereign citizens reject the notion that current laws have any force over them.

“The Freemen, and Mr. Boisjoli in particular in this case, they use a plethora of documents that mean absolutely nothing. They’re just cutting and pasting from all over the internet,” he said.

The investigation took eight months to complete, but Gerrard said it was worth pursuing.

“When we look at people who are attempting to subvert our entire criminal justice system for their own ends, than we have to see that as very serious,” he said.

Gerrard said he hopes it sends a message to people who espouse this ideology.

“We have tolerated the Freemen and the Sovereign Citizens to a certain extent and now that level of tolerance has come to an end and we want to make it clear that if people are going to engage in this type of behavior that we will robustly investigate.”

Boisjoliwill was charged in August and will make his next court appearance on Nov. 7.

Det. Rae Gerrard said the documents the Freemen present have no legal force, but are meant to make people in the system want to drop the case.

ryan tumilty / for metro

Det. Rae Gerrard said the documents the Freemen present have no legal force, but are meant to make people in the system want to drop the case.