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In Edmonton, a haunted house worth lining up for

Deadmonton proving a massive success before Halloween weekend.

Lineups for Deadmonton Haunted House have been stretching around the block on Jasper Avenue.

Kevin Maimann / Metro Order this photo

Lineups for Deadmonton Haunted House have been stretching around the block on Jasper Avenue.

You could watch two classic horror flicks in the time it takes to get to the front of the line at Deadmonton Haunted House, but that doesn’t seem to matter to Edmontonians looking for a scare.

Ryan Kozar, who owns and operates the creepy attraction in the former Paramount Theatre, on Jasper Avenue, said people have waited as long as three-and-a-half hours to get in.

And Halloween weekend hasn’t even started.

“From when we open it’s a steady flow of people coming through,” Kozar said.

Some will start lining up at 5 p.m., two hours before it opens.

A firefighter by day, Kozar got the idea from videos he saw of haunted houses online and realized there was nothing like it Edmonton.

When he launched Deadmonton in 2014 it was an instant hit, and it’s grown in popularity each year.

A “crazy amount of work” goes into the attraction that operates for just more than a month, but the reactions from patrons make it worthwhile – and they really run the gamut.

“Crying, screaming, laughing, running, there’s lots of falling. Some people say they actually do wet themselves,” Kozar said.

He has 40 actors each night, including some that hang around outside to entertain those waiting in line and freak out unsuspecting passersby.

Groups are limited to five people.

The scares start in the 700-seat theatre, with a circus-themed room that touches on “clown phobia,” and then it moves into a dingy basement where all types of horrors await.

“As you get older, Halloween disappears for adults,” Kozar said. “So I think bringing Halloween back, it just kind of brings back your youth. It’s so much fun.”

For closing weekend on Nov. 4 and 5, Deadmonton House will have “lights off” nights where each group gets one flashlight to navigate.

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