News / Edmonton

5 things to look forward to from the fall session at the Alberta legislature

Tax credits, education, climate change, and infrastructure funding are all in store when the Alberta legislature meets again on Monday

Expect a fiery debate from MLAs when they return to the Alberta legislature on Monday.

Expect a fiery debate from MLAs when they return to the Alberta legislature on Monday.

Alberta MLAs are set to strap on their boots starting Monday, in what is expected to be another fiery legislative sitting. On Thursday, House Leader Brian Mason outlined what you can look forward to in the fall session. It’s expected MLAs will debate 15 bills. 

A film set in Edmonton.

Metro File

A film set in Edmonton.

Tax Credits

The Alberta government will establish two new tax credits as part of its plan to create jobs. Mason said there will be a 30 per cent tax credit given to investors who invest their money into small business involved in research and development, interactive digital media, post-production, digital animation and tourism. A capital investment tax credit will return 10 per cent of corporation costs in capital assets, like machines, equipment and buildings. 

The Edmonton skyline.

Metro File

The Edmonton skyline.

Municipal Government Act 

It’s back, and Mason hopes it’ll be dealt with by the end of the session. Mason said it’s an extensive bill, which deals with all aspects of municipal governance. He said there will be some amendments to the bill, which gives broader powers to municipalities, like curbing the cost of growth and boosting affordable housing. It could also lead to higher costs for new homes, as developers pass on costs to consumers.

Education minister David Eggen.

Metro File

Education minister David Eggen.

Education 

Mason highlighted a new initiative called Future Ready. The plan will use government investments that prepare students for the “changing world.” One Future Ready initiative included the government’s curriculum review, where it launched an online survey to see what Albertans think should be in the new curriculum. 

The electricity grid.

The Canadian Press

The electricity grid.

Climate Change

Mason said the government will introduce an act that will legally limit oil-sands carbon emissions to 100 mega-tonnes. He said the government will encourage innovate oil-extraction methods that cause less emissions, adding the province will continue to push for progress on pipelines. The government will also support 5,000 megawatts of renewable energy to the grid. 

The Calgary CTrain.

The Calgary CTrain.

Green Line

Mason said there’s “certainly a possibility” the province will use money from its Green Transit Incentives Program for Calgary's Green Line, after advocacy group LRT on the Green challenged the government to commit $1.53 billion over ten years. Though Mason appreciates LRT on the Green’s proposal, he said the government is working with Calgary Mayor Naheed Nenshi on the transit plan. He also acknowledged the infrastructure needs of other municipalities.

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