News / Edmonton

Been wondering about Edmonton's fog? It's mist, says Environment Canada

And it's the result of a simple equation: A lot of moisture and not a lot of wind.

November has been a misty month.

Kevin Tuong/For Metro

November has been a misty month.

City residents want to know: Why is it so foggy these days?

Well, according to Environment Canada Meteorologist Dan Kulak, it isn't fog.

Instead, it's mist that's blanketing the city, and it's the result of a simple equation: A lot of moisture and not a lot of wind.  

“We’ve had a relatively mild November, and it’s taken a lot time for the surface water to freeze,” Kulak said. “And we’ve got a very stagnant air mass. There hasn’t been a lot of wind for days now.”

The haze doesn’t quite clear the bar for what Environment Canada considers true fog — that's a word they only use when visibility drops below about 800 metres — but it’s still a mist that has hung on day after day.

“This is more indicative of what we might get in the middle of February, when you get a really stagnant air mass,” Kulak said.

But the end of the f ... err, mist ... may be in sight: With temperatures expected to drop back into the wintery range next week the mist will likely disappear as the cold air moves in and the rivers start to freeze, Kulak said.

“We’ve had a good run here if you don’t like winter, but to think we’re going to escape it totally is probably unrealistic.”

It’s been an unseasonably warm November in the city, with one of the warmest starts to the month in decades.

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