News / Edmonton

Edmonton Vision Zero 2017 to focus on schools, people

City sees fewer traffic deaths in 2016

City staff say the city is working with the province, police, school boards and planners to look at where schools are located, making sure they’re put in the “best places.”

File photo

City staff say the city is working with the province, police, school boards and planners to look at where schools are located, making sure they’re put in the “best places.”

Edmonton’s plans to reduce traffic deaths and serious injuries to zero will continue to “gain momentum” this year, says the city’s traffic safety boss. 

“We’re looking at two major safety campaigns,” said Gerry Shimko, traffic safety executive director with the city. “One with focus on pedestrian safety and the other will be distracted driving — those tend to be the ones that have the greatest impact.”

Shimko’s comments come after the city released its annual report Friday over Vision Zero projects, which look to reduce traffic fatalities as Edmonton continues to see pedestrians get hit and killed by drivers behind the wheel. 

The annual report showed there were 22 traffic deaths in 2016, down from 30 in 2015. 

Going forward, Shimko said plans will emphasize school safety. 

He said the city is working with the province, police, school boards and planners to look at where schools are located, making sure they’re put in the “best places.”

“It’s to make sure the schools are operating as safe as they can,” he said, noting Edmonton plans to extend 30 km/h zones to junior highs. 

“The long-term objective is that nobody will be seriously injured or die as a result of being in or around a school.”

There will also be an online photo radar map coming this June, which would display the locations of the cameras for drivers to see on a weekly basis. 

City traffic planners say the goal of the map is to show how speeds have reduced since the radar sites were installed. 

Shimko said the city will also encourage residents to share their stories over being affected by a traffic death or injury. 

“It’s to get a better understanding of the impact of a preventable collision,” he said.

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