News / Edmonton

City on the right path to #MakeItAwkward

#MakeItAwkward co-founder supports Edmonton’s efforts

Make It Awkward’s Jesse Lipscombe believe the city is on the right track when it comes to combating racism.

File photo

Make It Awkward’s Jesse Lipscombe believe the city is on the right track when it comes to combating racism.

The city is on track to combat racism, says Make It Awkward’s Jesse Lipscombe, as Edmonton will up the ante over the issue this year. 

“At the end of the day, the reason we have these issues is we don’t speak about racism or educate ourselves on different cultures,” said Lipscombe, who was subject to racial slurs last year. 

City councillors will look at a report Monday that outlines Edmonton’s next steps to heighten anti-racism projects to address the issue. 

The push comes after city council tasked administration with developing a plan to tackle Edmonton’s racism problem by working with local groups and the public. High-profile incidents of racism have also blanked the city.

“I think many Edmontonians would be shocked to hear some of the things people of other cultures go through,” said Coun. Scott McKeen, noting instances such as anti-Sikh posters being distributed at the University of Alberta. 

“In my discussions with the Indigenous communities, they face it way too much,” he added.

The report noted Edmonton will introduce new awareness campaigns this year that will share stories of people who’ve experienced racism. On top of that, the city will do broad consultation with residents via surveys and public meetings. 

All of that work will go into developing a new framework that will determine how the city will support anti-racism projects spearheaded by citizen-led groups. 

“The city is going in the right direction,” Lipscombe said. “I’m behind it 100 per cent.”

Following public consultations, the city will return to council with recommendations on the anti-racism framework in January.

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