News / Edmonton

Nature Conservancy works with land trust to save old-growth forest near Edmonton

A mule deer rests in the grass in the early morning at Dinosaur Provincial Park in Alberta, June 25, 2014.

Todd Korol / Toronto Star

A mule deer rests in the grass in the early morning at Dinosaur Provincial Park in Alberta, June 25, 2014.

EDMONTON — An unspoiled old-growth forest near Edmonton is receiving protection with the help of the Nature Conservancy of Canada, a land trust group and local landowners.

Bunchberry Meadows supports jack pines as large as two metres around and is habitat for northern flying squirrels, porcupines and long-tailed weasels.

The 260 hectares being conserved are just 30 kilometres from downtown Edmonton and are near the North Saskatchewan River.

The nature conservancy says five families owned and cared for the land for more than 40 years.

They kept it intact through significant development and the area is now surrounded by acreages, airports, roads, bridges and industry.

It took two years for the conservancy and the Edmonton and Area Land Trust to acquire the property.

Bunchberry Meadows has some of the oldest jack pine in Alberta. The trees provide important habitat for species such as great- horned owls, moose, white-tailed deer, woodchucks, birds and amphibians such as tiger salamanders.

 

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