News / Edmonton

Taste, don't waste: K-Days donating leftover food to people in need

Leftovers Foundation in Edmonton will collect the items and provide them to agencies

Vivian Kwan, volunteer co-ordinator with Leftovers Foundation, will be providing K-Days fair food products to people in need.

Jeremy Simes / Metro Order this photo

Vivian Kwan, volunteer co-ordinator with Leftovers Foundation, will be providing K-Days fair food products to people in need.

K-Days is wrangling up leftover food items Monday from 31 fair vendors and donate them to agencies in need.

But most of the leftover grub won’t likely be of the deep-fried assortment. Instead, think fresh produce, meat or other items that are used prior to dishes actually being made.

“I don’t think the deep-fried food would be OK, because they might be soggy after a certain period of time,” said Vivian Kwan, volunteer coordinator with the Leftovers Foundation in Edmonton.

The group will be the middle person between K-Days and agencies, collecting the items from the fair and dropping them off to shelters or day camps for groups like Big Brothers Big Sisters.

The organization expects to collect about 300 to 350 pounds of leftover food, which will make 100 to 150 meals. Leftovers Foundation originated in Calgary, growing to a point where they realized it was time to expand to Edmonton, according to Kwan.

“Now that we’re Edmonton, we’ve been progressively growing — we work with all kinds of restaurants and cafes now,” she said. “It’s great because with more interest, we’re able to talk more about food sustainability and support our inner city populations.”

She explained the food bank isn’t open in the evening, by them doing personal deliveries at night, they are filling a void for people in need who can’t access the food bank in time.

“It’s really important to get out this message that leftovers can still be used,” she said.

For instance, it’s easy to use older but not rotten meat or vegetables for a hearty and healthy stew, Kwan said.

“There are lots of opportunities that I don’t think people realize,” she said. “So, having these events are good at just educating people about them.”

More on Metronews.ca