News / Edmonton

Edmonton music podcast makes it to 100 episodes after four years

'If I get one person buying somebody’s album or discovering a band, I’m happy,' says Cups N Cakes podcast's Jeff MacCallum

Carey Newton, left, and Jeff MacCallum in their Cups N Cakes Podcast home studio.

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Carey Newton, left, and Jeff MacCallum in their Cups N Cakes Podcast home studio.

Spreading local music to the masses is a lot of work, but after four years it’s finally getting easier for the hosts of an Edmonton Internet radio show.

Jeff MacCallum and Carey Newton are celebrating the 100th episode of the Cups N Cakes podcast this week.

“Before, I had to e-mail every single band that I wanted to play – ask for their music to be sent to me, and just really try to stay on top of what was good and current,” MacCallum said of the show’s early days.

That has changed, as the show has gradually gained prominence and started getting submissions from artists who want airtime.

MacCallum has also expanded the Cups N Cakes reach by adding a new album review to its website every Wednesday and an exclusive band interview every second Friday.

When MacCallum and Newton launched the project in a makeshift home studio four years ago, they were just looking for an excuse to get together for laughs and beers every two weeks.

“We started as a way to kind of just maintain our friendship,” MacCallum said.

“I never really thought about how far it would go, honestly.”

For episode 100, MacCallum and Newton moved into True North Recording Studios for an epic gathering of prominent figures in Edmonton’s music scene.

Wares, Screaming Targets and Jesse and the Dandelions performed in studio and were joined by promoter Craig Martell, music writer Brittany Rudyck and CJSR program director Chad Brunet for a somewhat chaotic discussion, where everyone was miked up for the entire episode.

“It was an editing nightmare,” MacCallum laughed. “It took about 10 times longer than it normally does to edit.”

The episode was recorded in October and finally went online this week.

MacCallum attributes the show’s steady growth to his passion as a fan of independent music and dedication to never missing an episode.

“It means a lot to me, and I’ve gained a lot from the music I see live or hear on record from a lot of these bands that don’t get the support that I feel they deserve,” MacCallum said.

“Just because of how much I’ve gotten out of it and how much it’s impacted my life, I want to give back and share it a little bit.

“If I get one person buying somebody’s album or discovering a band, I’m happy.”

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