News / Edmonton

Albertans say no to National Day of Remembrance and Action on Islamophobia: Poll

Poll results coincide with one-year anniversary since a shooter killed six people at Quebec City’s Islamic Cultural Centre.

About 40 to 50 Edmontonians gathered at the steps of the Alberta Legislature on Monday evening to commemorate the one-year anniversary since a shooter killed six people and injured 19 others at Quebec City’s Islamic Cultural Centre.

Omar Mosleh / Metro

About 40 to 50 Edmontonians gathered at the steps of the Alberta Legislature on Monday evening to commemorate the one-year anniversary since a shooter killed six people and injured 19 others at Quebec City’s Islamic Cultural Centre.

On the one-year anniversary of a deadly shooting at a Quebec City mosque, a new poll shows most Albertans oppose the idea of a National Day of Remembrance and Action on Islamophobia.

The Forum Research poll, released Friday, shows Albertans are the most likely in Canada to “strongly disapprove” the day of remembrance, at 50 per cent, while another five per cent “somewhat disapprove.”

Only 12 per cent somewhat or strongly approve.

“That poll motivates me and tells me that we have a lot of work to do,” said Ahmed Abdulkhadir, executive director of the Ogaden Somali Community of Alberta Residents.

Abdulkhadir helped organize a gathering outside the Alberta legislature Monday to commemorate the one-year anniversary since a shooter killed six people and injured 19 others at Quebec City’s Islamic Cultural Centre.

About 40 to 50 Albertans showed up at the steps of the Alberta Legislature on Monday evening, holding signs with the names of the victims of the Quebec shooting as well as other signs expressing support for Muslims and opposition to xenophobia.

Omar Mosleh/Metro

About 40 to 50 Albertans showed up at the steps of the Alberta Legislature on Monday evening, holding signs with the names of the victims of the Quebec shooting as well as other signs expressing support for Muslims and opposition to xenophobia.

Roughly 40 to 50 people attended the commemoration.

“It demonstrated we’re resilient no matter what. People were coming together, standing together, holding hands, praying together with different faiths, community leaders and politicians,” Abdulkhadir said.

“It’s about education. It’s about doing the small steps, talking to your neighbours. It’s not about something that’s exclusive to the Muslim community, it’s something we expect all our community to do – to speak out when they see hate."

James Edwards, who attended the rally, said it’s important for everyone to call out hatred against the Muslim community when they see it.

“When racism is really present, and Islamophobia is really present, it’s pretty important that even old white guys like me call it out,” Edwards said.

Protesters against the federal anti-Islamophobia Bill M103 demonstrated in the same spot hours before the event.

Albertans’ opinions are not far out of line with the rest of the country when it comes to a national day of remembrance.

Across Canada, 39 per cent strongly disapprove while 17 per cent say they approve – though only seven per cent strongly approve.

The poll used a random sampling of 1,408 Canadian voters.

With files from Omar Mosleh

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