News / Halifax

Nova Scotia SPCA launches new mobile spay and neuter clinic

The Nova Scotia SPCA's mobile clinic will be travelling across the province, spaying and neutering feral cats, shelter dogs, and animals on First Nations.

Cocoa, a four-year-old American bulldog mix, sits in the passenger's seat of the Nova Scotia SPCA's new Mobile Spay and Neuter Clinic.

Zane Woodford / Metro Order this photo

Cocoa, a four-year-old American bulldog mix, sits in the passenger's seat of the Nova Scotia SPCA's new Mobile Spay and Neuter Clinic.

Animals beware: the Nova Scotia chapter of the SPCA’s new Mobile Spay and Neuter Clinic is hitting the road soon.

The mobile clinic will be travelling across the province, spaying and neutering feral cats, shelter dogs, and animals on First Nations.

“Essentially it’s a surgical room on wheels,” Nova Scotia SPCA CEO Elizabeth Murphy said on Monday. “We provide the surgical team, the surgical room, and we come onto the locations and we deal with all of the animal care needs.”

Starting out, the clinic will be focusing on the SPCA’s Trap Neuter Release (TNR) program, seeking out feral cat colonies in rural Nova Scotia.

There are hundreds of thousands of feral cats in the province, and the TNR program aims to keep that number from growing even further.

Alison Pollard, the SPCA veterinarian tasked with doing the surgeries, said she can do up to 40 cats a day in the small space in the back of the new clinic.

“It’s very much a conveyer belt,” she said.

The Nova Scotia SPCA's new mobile spay and neuter clinic at the SPCA's Dartmouth shelter on Monday.

Zane Woodford/Metro

The Nova Scotia SPCA's new mobile spay and neuter clinic at the SPCA's Dartmouth shelter on Monday.

The expansion of the program, and the purchase of the vehicle itself, were made possible by significant donations from two families: that of Dr. Susan Roberts, and Eleanor Dyke.

Richard Dyke is Eleanor’s stepson. She ran a jewelery store in Yarmouth for years with Richard’s father, and saw the problems caused by the rising feral cat population first hand.

“They’ve left a fairly generous bequest of which this is part to help improve that situation,” he said.

“People give money and they think, ‘Yeah I want a building with my name on it.’ That wasn’t their goal. Their goal was to actually make a real difference.”

Raymond Roberts is Dr. Susan Roberts’ brother. He said his sister always treated animals “like royalty.”

“We’re very proud,” he said. “It’s a very concrete example of putting money into action, and I find SPCA is so very good with their strategic decisions, and it’s really good to see this.”

Puppy Freya gets a treat from Karen Dewolfe with the SPCA at the mobile clinic’s launch event on Monday.

Zane Woodford/Metro

Puppy Freya gets a treat from Karen Dewolfe with the SPCA at the mobile clinic’s launch event on Monday.

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