News / Halifax

New funding to help indigenous women and children fleeing domestic violence

Joint provincial and federal government announcement sees commitment of up to $824,000 for second-stage housing project.

Pamela Glode-Desrochers, executive director of the Mi'kmaw Native Friendship Centre, in a December 2015 file photo. Glode-Desrochers described the new project as "a game changer for indigenous women and children in need."

Jeff Harper/Metro

Pamela Glode-Desrochers, executive director of the Mi'kmaw Native Friendship Centre, in a December 2015 file photo. Glode-Desrochers described the new project as "a game changer for indigenous women and children in need."

Indigenous women and children fleeing domestic violence will soon have a safe new place to call home.

Provincial and federal government funding for second-stage housing was announced Friday at the Mi’kmaw Native Friendship Centre in Halifax.

In a media release, Joanne Bernard, minister responsible for Housing Nova Scotia and the Nova Scotia Advisory Council on the Status of Women, said the initiative was an important government priority.

"We know indigenous women need a culturally sensitive approach that supports their specific needs,” Bernard said.

“This unit will help women and children get the support and help they need to improve their lives."

Second-stage housing is longer-term, individual housing, where tenants can live for an extended time. It offers programs and services to help them transition to independent living.

The provincial and federal governments have committed up to $824,000 for the four-unit development.

Through this project, the Mi'kmaw Native Friendship Centre plans to provide support services for victims of domestic violence, including counselling, parenting and employment programs.

The Mi'kmaw Native Friendship Centre is a registered not-for-profit organization, working to improve the lives of urban indigenous peoples.

"This project is a game changer for indigenous women and children in need, creating a culturally appropriate and safe space for them," said Pamela Glode-Desrochers, executive director, Mi'kmaw Native Friendship Centre.

"Our organization recognizes that partnerships with the federal and provincial governments help to change the future for all our communities. These projects help achieve true reconciliation for our communities."

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