News / Halifax

Nova Scotia parent group tracking how money for classroom conditions 'will actually be spent'

The website was announced the same day Nova Scotia's new Council to Improve Classroom Conditions was scheduled to have its first meeting.

A crowd rallies in Grand Parade this February in an event organized by the group Parents for Teachers.

Jeff Harper/Metro

A crowd rallies in Grand Parade this February in an event organized by the group Parents for Teachers.

A group of parents supporting Nova Scotia teachers have started a new website to keep track of any developments in classroom conditions.

The Nova Scotia Parents for Teachers group launched the new website, novascotiaparentsforteachers.ca, the same day the Council to Improve Classroom Conditions was scheduled to have its first meeting.

“The reason for this is to inform the public of things that are going on in the education system, and correcting some of the misinformation that’s been put out there,” said group spokesperson Trish Keeping.

“Our big thing is to get the information out to people so they really understand what is going on in the classroom and how the kids are being affected."

Nova Scotia Parents for Teachers has a Facebook group that currently has 19,242 members. It’s a closed group that accepts people who join, but the contents are not visible to non-members.

“Having it behind closed doors isn’t helping members of the public know what’s going on,” said Keeping.

The website contains a myth buster section outlining four issues the group views as myths and detailed explanations of why they do not believe these issues are misinformation. It also features stories gathered from parents, current teachers, retired teachers, students and recent graduates. Information in French is also included.

Nova Scotia Parents for Teachers plans to closely monitor the actions of the Council to Improve Classroom Conditions.

The 14-member council includes nine teachers chosen by school board superintendents, one student, one parent, a province-appointed guidance counselor and co-chairs from the Department of Education and the Nova Scotia Teachers Union.

A budget of $20 million was given to the council over two years, part of the Bill 75 legislation passed by the Liberal government to end a 16-month contract dispute and the teacher’s work-to-rule job action.

“We need to make sure that what they’re doing is actually helping with the conditions in the classrooms right now, how long this is going to take and how the money will actually be spent,” Keeping said. 

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