News / Halifax

'Popping up all over:' Halifax Makerspace needs more members to grow into new space

The non-profit group of "makers" have signed a lease on a Bedford building and are encouraging like-minded folks to join them.

Halifax Makerspace mascot/sign from one of the group's recent social nights.

Halifax Makerspace

Halifax Makerspace mascot/sign from one of the group's recent social nights.

If you like making things and dream of sharing a space and tools with like-minded people, Halifax Makerspace could use a hand or more.

The non-profit group has been around for about five years and wants people to get excited about making things.

They’ve been without a physical location for a few years but recently signed a lease on a space in Bedford they hope will become their member-driven community workshop.

To ensure its ultimate success, they need more members by July 31.

“Makerspaces are popping up all over…They give an actual physical space for people who might not have it to build or work on projects and they provide a community amongst makers to encourage each other to learn new skills and to build new things,” explained Shawn Wilson, one of the group’s directors.

“The other thing that we do and that we have been doing even without a space is community service projects. We’ve been working on a number of community projects even without a space. Just in people’s basements, basically.”

Halifax Makerspace members have built a pinball machine for Hal Con, hosted electronics workshops at local libraries, built a free little library for Word on the Street, and created Nocturne projects.

Halifax Makerspace president Adam Cox soldering a faulty pinball connection.

Halifax Makerspace

Halifax Makerspace president Adam Cox soldering a faulty pinball connection.

They’ve participated in library repair cafes, and this Sunday will host a workshop at the Halifax Central Library to teach people how to make an “automatic plant waterer” to detect soil moisture and water a plant when needed.

“Makers” use everything from wood to metal, plastic, fabric, or whatever else.

“The ideal member for the Halifax Makerspace is basically somebody who wants to make,” Wilson said.

“Whether or not they have the skills or tools to do it is not really relevant because part of the maker ethos is that if you don’t know how to do something you just learn to do it. It’s just something else to check off on your way to getting the thing done.”

To learn more about Halifax Makerspace and membership, visit their website.

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