News / Halifax

Second great white shark detected off Nova Scotia in apparent hunt for seals

A great white shark.

DISCOVERY CHANNEL / THE ASSOCIATED PRESS FILE PHOTO

A great white shark.

HALIFAX — Another great white shark has been detected off Nova Scotia.

A tag attached to Savannah, a 210-kilogram shark, pinged Monday morning off Barren Island near Sherbooke on the province's eastern shore.

It joins a 600-kilogram tagged shark named Hilton, who has spent more than a week along Nova Scotia's south shore, and most recently pinged Monday night off Peggys Cove outside Halifax.

Both sharks were tagged by the research group Ocearch, and are being watched closely through an Ocearch tracking map and their own Twitter feeds with thousands of followers. 

The 210-kilogram great white shark named Savannah joins 600 kg tagged great white shark Hilton just off Nova Scotia. Hilton most recently pinged just off Peggy's Cove on Monday night.

Twitter/@SharkSavannah

The 210-kilogram great white shark named Savannah joins 600 kg tagged great white shark Hilton just off Nova Scotia. Hilton most recently pinged just off Peggy's Cove on Monday night.

Ocearch chairman Chris Fischer has said white sharks could be using Nova Scotia's Sable Island as a place to mate.

The sharks are also likely drawn to the province to feed on seals.

On Tuesday, Hilton's Twitter feed responded to a tweet showing seals off Grandmother's Cove near Lunenburg, N.S., with a drool emoji and the words: "Mmmm yummy seals."

Rear Admiral John Newton, who commands Canada's East Coast navy, also tweeted a photo Monday of a south shore inlet, saying "@HiltonTheShark has been scaring the seals right up into our cove today. First time seeing them hanging in the shallows."

On Monday, Hilton had tweeted a map showing his Nova Scotia location and called to another Twitter-using shark: "Hey @SharkSavannah, come on up. Lots of good eating here!''

In November, a 900-kilogram great white named Lydia — who also has her own Ocearch-managed Twitter account — was among two tracking off Nova Scotia.

The Atlantic White Shark Conservancy says the animal is the largest predatory fish in the world, with a powerful jaw full of serrated teeth and a body that can weigh up to 1,800 kilograms. But it says the population in the North Atlantic has dropped by 75 per cent in the past 15 years and is listed by the International Union for Conservation of Nature as vulnerable.

They have been protected from harvesting in U.S. waters since 1991, but the conservancy says still so little is known about where the sharks travel, pup and feed.

More on Metronews.ca