News / Halifax

Raising their voices: Halifax song and video highlight issue of violence against women

'Sisterhood' is the final product of the Women Safe & Sound art project by Halifax's Music Liberatory, a collaboration of about 70 women, primarily women of colour.

Tamar Dina is with the Music Liberatory.

Zane Woodford/Metro / Metro Order this photo

Tamar Dina is with the Music Liberatory.

A song and accompanying video tackling the issue of violence against women is making its debut in Halifax this week.

The song is called Sisterhood and the video is the final product of the Women Safe & Sound art project by the Music Liberatory.

The project is a collaboration of about 70 women, primarily women of colour. It makes its public debut on Friday at the Bus Stop Theatre as part of the Prismatic Arts Festival.

The song centres around one woman helping another escape a violent domestic situation.  

“It is done with poetry and subtlety. It’s not over the head. We are proud of the music and we are proud of the storytelling and the images in the film which are subtle and original,” explained Tamar Dina, coordinator of the Women Safe & Sound project.

“It was an all-women collaboration. Men didn’t touch a thing in this. They didn’t help us set up anything, they didn’t do tech work. We wanted to make sure only women touched the project to maintain independence.”

Last year the Music Liberatory hosted a series of workshops that attracted women of varied ages, races and backgrounds. They developed original song lyrics and helped create the accompanying video to share the story. The end result is a professional quality product.

“The song is created by women for women. If you compare that to most music available in mainstream and subculture, women are primarily talking to men so this was redirecting who the audience was,” Dina said.

“It’s talking to other women as equals, not coming from a position of any type of authority. It’s just trying to maintain and bring light to women’s relationships to each other.”

After the music video’s release, Dina said they intend to do a “soft launch” of what they’re calling a ‘Sisterhood cover me’ campaign. They’re asking artists to redo the song in their own genre and in their own way as long as they stay true to the lyrics.

“From this collaborative process, women definitely got community, confidence and the opportunity to take their experiences and to make them into art. In the context of violence against women, because that’s what this song is about, there is very ltitle recourse for a woman,” she said.

"Women are, for the most part, left dealing with the damage that a man has inflicted on them. To be part of a creative process is to take that experience and transform it and to be in complete control of that transformation.”

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