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Going on tour involves more than just Funyuns and Big Gulps

Ottawa workshop is meant for bands who think they can just buy a van, fill it with their mates and rock the country to bits.

Trevor Alguire is one of the panelists for How to Make Money on Tour.

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Trevor Alguire is one of the panelists for How to Make Money on Tour.

There aren't many things worse for a band on tour than blowing your entire budget on a new muffler, windshield or new gear after getting robbed at a skeezy Manitoba motel.

Samantha Everts has heard the nightmarish tales of ill-prepared bands who think they can just buy a van, fill it with their mates and rock the country to bits – they never end like the movies do.

For Everts, who's been promoting music since her teenaged years and managing bands along the way, there's a lot more to think about than just Funyuns, Big Gulps and gasoline when heading out on the road for the first time – a lot more.

“You’re never going to make a lot of money on the road unless you have a plan in advance,” says Everts, adding that most bands don’t think about the little things that can make or break a band on the road.

“How does my merch set up look? How can I make sure I can sell tickets in advance? There is so much more than just showing up at a venue and saying, ‘I’m a rock star, come to my show.’ Just even little things like making sure you have an oil change and connecting with local bands that open for you.”

But don’t just take it from her. Everts has assembled an impressive panel of artists and industry peeps to teach emerging bands tips and tricks on the road for the How to Make Money on Tour workshop at the Bluesfest School of Music & Art.

And it’s not massive bands that have cult-status followings either, but, rather, guys like Trevor Alguire, who have gone out on the road with a solid financial plan in place before stepping on the gas. Alguire will talk about his many tours across Europe and North America playing in small clubs, and how he has always managed to come back in the black.

Want to know how bands like A Tribe Called Red, Young Empires, Grandtheft and Bedouin Soundclash make scratch on the road? Listen in on Pirates Blend Label and Artist Manager Sean Ramesbottom’s talk and you’ll likely be amazed at how much detailed work goes into a short, cross-country tour.

“If you have some extra guitar strings, that’s great, but what about having some kick-ass merch?” says Everts, who will moderate the Oct. 26 workshop.

“What about having enough records to sell? What about having all of your records printed before going out on the road?”

Jon Evenchick, owner and founder of Live! On Elgin, rounds out the panelists.

The workshop is just $10 per person or $20 to bring your whole band. For more information and to register, visit www.bsoma.ca.

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