News / Ottawa

Carleton University students selling adult colouring books for charity

From university students to Hintonburg residents, everyone is jumping on the adult colouring book trend.

Luis Pardo, one of the members of the student group who put together the book, says that adult colouring books have more complex art that makes them different than colouring books for kids.

Ashley Moffatt / For Metro

Luis Pardo, one of the members of the student group who put together the book, says that adult colouring books have more complex art that makes them different than colouring books for kids.

As more and more adults get into colouring books, one group of Ottawa students is working together to make their own and showcase artists' skills for a good cause.

A group of four Carleton University students put out a call to artists to help create a 40-page book, with the proceeds going to Canada’s Free the Children charity.

“Not only are they providing food for Canada, but abroad,” said Thomas Paul, a philosophy student. “They’re providing non-GMO foods and organic foods.”

Organic food is something that is important to Paul, and his colleagues decided to go with it.

The artists knew they weren’t being paid for their work, but liked the charity that the group was working with.

The project was originally pitched for a business class, but they don’t want to stop there.

“I really want to continue beyond this class,” said Paul. “Keep doing it on our own accord.”

The book contains various styles of art – which project member Luis Pardo says distinguishes it from children’s colouring books.

“Colouring books for children aren’t as complex,” said Pardo. “It’s meant for a more mature audience.”

The book reflects the combination of artists who contributed to the project.

“We wanted a mix of designs,” said Paul. “There’s mandalas, landscapes, floral artwork and geometric designs.”

They searched for artists all over Canada and even artists abroad to get as much diversity into the book as possible.

It is being sold through their website (colormylife.ca) and retails for $18. It’s on sale until March 21st.

"We’ve sold about eight copies,” said Pardo. “Which comes to about $200.”

The book aims to help their buyers de-stress.  

“We wanted to be different,” said Paul. “We didn’t want to fit in with the crowd.”

They chose to do a colouring book as their project because they noticed it was a top seller on Amazon. Colouring is also a popular pastime for many people in Ottawa.

The Hintonburg Happening, an art show in the community, also commissioned an adult colouring book. They thought it would be a fun and inclusive way to raise funds for the festival.

“Each artist has a very different style,” said Summer Baird, co-ordinator for The Hintonburg Happening. “There’s even one aspiring artist who’s 10 or 11, Thomas Slaughter. He’s a local resident. The rest of them are professional artists in the neighbourhood.”

Slaughter came to Baird’s attention when she saw his art in her daughter’s classroom. He was interested in art, so she decided to submit some of his work to a local show. His work was some of the most talked about, so they decided to ask him to contribute to the colouring book.

The proceeds from the book are being split between The Hintonburg Happening and Slaughter’s school.

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