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Hunt Club residents to review best playground options for Paul Landry Park

Local residents are being asked to pick out their preferred playground features during an upcoming consultation meeting.

Paul Landry Park has already been on the receiving end of some tender loving care thanks to the Hunt Club Community Organization and other local residents. Now they are being asked to pick out their preferred playground features during an upcoming consultation meeting.

Metroland Media file photo

Paul Landry Park has already been on the receiving end of some tender loving care thanks to the Hunt Club Community Organization and other local residents. Now they are being asked to pick out their preferred playground features during an upcoming consultation meeting.

Though playtime at Paul Landry Park in the Hunt Club community is winding down with the arrival of winter temperatures, things are heating up behind the scenes.

Area residents are invited to drop in to shop for features they’d like to see added to the green space to reinvigorate it as a children’s play area.

River Coun. Riley Brockington is hosting an open house on Dec. 14 that is designed to garner a community vision for a future play structure at the park, located along Uplands Drive south of Paul Anka Drive.

“The city is going to present three options, which aren’t all binding, because if you don’t like a piece of a play structure we can replace it with something else,” said Brockington, who will join a city planner at the meeting to listen to what residents like and don’t like. “And then you can sort of customize your own play structure.”

A similar consultation process was held last year to improve Owl Park, also in Hunt Club. Different options were presented on placards around the room and residents were able to browse for their favourite designs, leading to the revamped park that is now in place, the councillor said.

Local residents and the Hunt Club Community Organization have been advocating for change at Paul Landry Park, which they say is aging and requires a complete overhaul. Brockington agrees it is past its prime.

He secured $300,000, half of which is earmarked for Paul Landry Park, and the rest for a Carlington park in the west end of the ward.

But the funds weren’t expected to be available until 2018, so Brockington secured an advance from another councillor’s cash-in-lieu-of-parkland fund, which will be paid back in 2018.

“It has happened in other wards,” Brockington noted.

Feedback from the upcoming consultation meeting will be reviewed and shared with residents and the association. Next steps would be a second round of consultation “so that we get the community buy-in and then give the green light to the planner to go ahead and procure and proceed,” Brockington said.

The park revamp will be a 2017 project and the goal is to see it finished next year. Brockington said he doesn’t know when construction will begin.

This story originally appeared in Metroland Media.

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