News / Ottawa

Union calls for second pay system for people dealing with Phoenix

Almost a year after it was introduced, Phoneix continues to have issues.

Debi Daviau, president of the Professional Institute of the Public Service, speaks to a reporters at a press conference on Thursday.

Ryan Tumilty / Metro

Debi Daviau, president of the Professional Institute of the Public Service, speaks to a reporters at a press conference on Thursday.

Frustrated by the continuing problems with the Phoenix pay system one public service union wants the government to bring in a second pay system until the issue can be resolved.

On Thursday, the Professional Institute of the Public Service called for the government to step in as they approach a full-year of the malfunctioning pay system.  

“It’s been almost a year since the Phoenix fiasco was foisted on our members and we need better system in place to help struggling civil servants,” said the group’s president Debi Daviau. “I'm frustrated and have run completely out of patience.”

Daviau said the government has a responsibility to pay its employees and individual department are ready to step in.

“Departments have the capacity to do this, I have met with several department heads. They're more than ready, willing and able to effect these changes,” she said.

In a statement, Judy Foote, the Minister of Public Services and Procurement, emphasized the government has a system for emergency loans already in place.

“There is absolutely no reason why anyone should go without his or her pay. Every employee can receive emergency salary advances for missing pay,” she said.

She said while they work to solve the bigger problem they have reminded managers and deputy ministers they can make salary advances available.

Daviau said that only covers people who are not receiving any pay at all, not any of the many other issues that have come up.

“We’re still seeing new problems every single pay cycle,” she said.  

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